KRYSTAL KLEAR VISIONS for women, by women

We speak to the Vanessa Masilo, a visionary, dreamer, and ambitious founder and CEO of KRYSTAL KLEAR VISIONS. She describes herself a focused individual who knew what she wanted from an early age and decided that one day she would build an empire and make a difference in society.

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Vanessa Masilo, a young black female entrepreneur, youth activist, philanthropist and
motivational speaker born and bred in Parys, Free State moved to Vanderbijlpark at the age of 17 where she studied Chartered Accountancy and later changed to Management Accounting at the North west University Vaal Triangle Campus. She proceeded to work in an upscale environment, assuring client delight on an asset management project which launched her as a professional in private sector and landed her a job at one of the biggest ICT Companies in Africa,EOH.  A year after joining EOH Vanessa felt she had gained all the necessary experience she needed as she had worked on various projects including Revenue Management, Business Planning and Consolidating, Credit Control and had also served on the CAB (Change AdvisoryBoard) of one of the major clients of EOH at the time.
Passionate about business and youth development, the move from corporate was a natural fit. She was courageous enough to resign and leave her comfort zone in private sector to pursue business. Her company which was registered in 2013 while she was a student then became fully operational in 2015 after she resigned. She focused on growing the business and building solidrelationships while also pursing her passion in the Philanthropy space. She established KVF (KLEAR VISIONS FOUNDATION) which is an NPC primarily focusing on women and children empowerment, skills development, moral regeneration, education and training to name a few.
Chairing and running this foundation Vanessa has made tremendous progress and has managed to change lives and also position herself as a young woman the youth can relate to, admire, look up to and run to for mentorship and guidance.

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Entering into the BRICS space was a bold move and she has never looked back. She was selected as one of the young, progressive entrepreneurs in the Free State and was sent to India to go represent South Africa at the BRICS YOUTH SUMMIT 2016, Vanessa is now part of the BRICS YOUTH NETWORK/PROGRAM and advocates for youth empowerment and inclusion within the BRICS Nations, focusing mainly on Entrepreneurship and Skills Development, Youth Volunteerism, Social Inclusion, Youth in Governance and Intra BRICS exchange programs and trade.
She serves on a number boards as an executive director namely: SAYEF (South African Youth Entrepreneurship Fund), YBT (Youth Business Transformation) and PELA (Peo Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy).
Vanessa is now spearheading the Sanitary Towels Project in the country and is one of the first black female manufacturers in the country. The project aims to assist disadvantaged school girls and ensure that school absenteeism due to lack of sanitary towels is a thing of the past.

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Despite having been blessed with great success at a tender age Vanessa Masilo believes that her career as an entrepreneur and social and political activist has just began. She hopes to one day grow her businesses in to a multibillion dollar empire with a global footprint. Whilst engaging in activism at both a continental and global level. She believes just as Napoleon Hill aptly put it that “there are no limitations to the mind except those it acknowledges”.

Her journey is to empower and emancipate young black women in South Africa and the African continent at large. Through entrepreneurship I will continue empowering other women and doing it at a very practical level like absorbing them into employment, upskilling and developing them, mentoring, exposing them to opportunities. I plan on doing roadshows, extensive marketing, partnering with other NPCs, NPOs, and NGOs who are also distributing Sanitary Towels in our schools and communities. I also plan on working with government, they have the capacity and a partnership with them would help us make a sustainable, impactful change.

#Womandla

#Singabantu Short Film Wins International United Nations Award

Singabantu, directly translated into isiXhosa as “We are human,” is an Afrophobia awareness short film which was recently shortlisted in the Top 60 out of 320 worldwide entries by PLURAL +, a youth festival on Migration run by the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations.

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The short film was shot in the remains of a house which was burnt down during a service delivery protests in Rosettenville, Johannesburg. This event turned into a nationwide wave of Afrophobic attacks. The film stars a diverse group of African immigrant youth from Zimbabwe, Zambia, DRC and Malawi living in South Africa sharing the daily plight they face being “foreigners” in South Africa, they make reference to different stereotypes attached to their home countries and end off with a call for unity, love and tolerance.

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The video was launched for Africa Month, and has aired on TRACE Africa where it was viewed in over 18 countries. It has also won the “I Am Migrant” award.

“I am really excited about the win, I am also shocked that my first attempt at writing and directing could receive such recognition”, said Louise Kanza, co-founder of Sophie A Kanza Foundation.

The award ceremony will take place on the 10th of November in New York City where the winners will be officially announced. Singabantu is the only African winner this year.

Sophie A Kanza Foundation hopes to take #Singabantu – We are human, an Afrophobia awareness film on a continental tour to turn it into a feature documentary. The long-term goal is to open an office and youth hub in their hometown Kinshasa. The organization’s current work includes Afrophobia awareness, youth volunteerism and sanitary health. Sophie lives by the organization’s motto “Creating a culture of good deeds”.

Sophie Kanza is the co-founder of Sophie A Kanza Foundation, a passionate pan African, change maker, peace activist, leader and believer born in the Democratic Republic of Congo living in South Africa. 

#Womandla

View short film here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4MocQZSrEw&feature=youtu.be

Meet a Singaporean Woman in STEM

Meet Melissa Tan (22), a final year undergraduate in Materials Science and Engineering at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

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Melissa is an avid scientist, innovator and educator. Her passion lies in developing human-machine interfaces particularly for medical care and educational uses. She also enjoys teaching and mentoring students in research and in materials engineering.

Seven years ago, as a high school student, she embarked on her very first research project, mentored by her biology teacher. Leading up to now, she has co-authored two publications, patented an invention, shared her research in international conferences, and traveled across the globe to learn and conduct research in a top research lab.

“Research is not for the faint-hearted. Being at the very edge of the discovery of new knowledge or the creation of a new technology means that failure is bound to happen. It is important to develop the resilience to try and try again despite the seemingly insurmountable challenges, because eventually, you will be the first human being to understand a new phenomenon or the first to develop a device that has the potential to help millions. That’s what keeps me going.” says Tan.

However, she describes the challenge that women scientists face even greater challenges than her male colleagues. She’s heard teachers commenting that it was not feminine for a girl to be involved in serious research in the physical sciences. “There was even fellow scholar who commented that it was more difficult for women to achieve tenured faculty positions in academia because the tenure grace period coincides with our reproductive window.”

She says she has met scientists, both men and women, who allayed her doubts about going into research and these are the mentors and role models who have guided her through this path over the years.

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Melissa is pictured here with her mentor Dr Kwok Sen Wai, holding up a conductive filament that they developed for 3-D printing electrical circuits, back in 2014.

Her advice to aspirant scientists and engineers: “It is crucial for young girls in STEM to identify role models and mentors whom they can rely on to guide them during difficult times and to give career advice.”

She hopes that more senior female scientists will share their stories of how they’ve overcome gender equality challenges so that others know that they are not alone in the struggle, and so that their younger counterparts have role models to look up to.

It’s been said that the more diverse a team is (in terms of gender, race, culture, educational background, etc), the more innovative it(team) will be. The next time you see a young girl tinkering away with a machine or playing with a chemistry set – encourage her.

We need more women in STEM!

#Womandla

My (unforgettable) United Nations experience

And so everyone is asking me the roving question: “How was your trip to the United Nations?”

Amazing seems to be the automated answer, but there’s so much more to the journey than that!

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We arrived in humid Bangkok, jet-lagged and sweating like pigs. I received ample warning about the weather, but nothing can prepare one to the actual feeling.

Many delegates arrived in groups representing their communities and societies. I came to learn that I was part of the very few representing myself. Well not just myself but the vision.

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Besides the well-themed motivational talks, UN panel discussions and the remarkable, young world-changers who graced the stage with a wealth of insight and experience, what stood out for me were the individuals of the delegation.

Never have I been in a room bursting with such passion, energy and honest hunger for knowledge on how to change the world.

That kind of environment leaves one curious for more, excited to make a difference and overflowing with new ideas.

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Another invaluable opportunity was that of networking and joining forces with not only like-minded individuals, but with people who can share the vision to other communities. Making friends is so easy when your hearts are in alignment. It makes the relationships more meaningful and purposeful.

I have added the well-curated video of the journey, which leaves me tearful every time I watch it. It’s crazy to think I was part of this, I witnessed all that was happening. I will write another entry of how Womandla aims to contribute to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 5 in Gender Equality.

Stay tuned and follow us on Facebook  for more!

#Womandla

Help me get to the UNITED NATIONS!

I have just been accepted for the UNITED NATIONS Young Leaders Symposium in Bangkok, Thailand, this August in relation to my social change efforts on Womandla.com

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I need to pay for the fees by 18 June 2017. PLEASE help me raise these funds.
I promise a little goes a long way!

I have started a crowdfunding page where you can support the vision:

https://www.gofundme.com/united-nations-symposium-2017 

Thank you to my friends and friends of friends who are pledging R200.

If 100 people help out – my prayers will be answered.

This is for the next generation ♥

#WomandlaToTheWorld