South Africa’s Star Netball Player

South Africa’s Star Netball Player

We recently spoke to Dumisani Chauke, a highly ambitious sportswoman in South Africa, about her latest achievements.


You are so WOMANDLA and wear many hats! Tell us what you do.

I am a Sport Organiser at Tshwane University of Technology in Pretoria. I am also the netball coordinator and coach. I am the assistant coach of the Gauteng Golden Fireballs competing in the upcoming Brutal Fruit netball Premier League. I am the assistant coach of the SA u21 netball team. I am the vice chair of USSA Netball. I am the founder and executive Chair-person of Dumisani Chauke Netball Foundation.

What inspired you to play Netball?

I used to watch other ladies play the sport on TV “Sesfikile” and deep down inside I wanted to be just like them. I did not really like netball in the beginning, but I fell in love with it when I realised how good I could be at it. The life skills it has taught me are invaluable. The opportunities it has presented me with plus the doors it has opened for me are immeasurable…

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

My biggest 1 right now is launching my own foundation. And second to that, is the opportunity I have been given by South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and Netball South Africa to travel with the SA Senior netball team as an Intern Coach to the upcoming Commonwealth Games in Australia. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity and I feel so blessed to be travelling with the team, going to the games, learning and being mentored by some of the best netball coaches in the world…it feels unreal for a Tsonga girl from the dusty streets of a small Malamulele Township in Limpopo. I cannot wait!

What struggles/problems have you have you had to overcome in South Africa?

The fact that netball is not a professional sport is still one of the biggest challenge that both players and coaches face. The lack of funding for the sport which then limits our resources and facilities. As a woman in the sport industry working with men, we are still undermined and we are always having to prove ourselves even though time and again we excel in our jobs/activities but the men in the end still have an advantage over us as women.
Do you think there is enough media coverage of women’s sport in general and if not what do you think could be done to fix this?

Not at all. We as women have to either beg for media coverage during prime time or we settle for the slots that are allocated to us on channels that the general population either doesn’t have or cannot access. In newspapers and magazines, you hardly read about the great work that women coaches and women sport leaders are doing, but on a daily basis you will find something about our male counterparts. I think we need to create our own media platforms. Be it TV, radio stations, magazines or newspapers, and even social media – since it is not being given to us, we need to create our own.

What would you say to aspiring Women in Sport?

Don’t let the suits, fancy shoes, happy socks and deep voices intimidate you, know your story and walk into this industry with confidence and your head held high. Whatever you want to achieve will not be given to you on a silver platter. You are going to have to work for it, prove yourself time and again, and then do some more work, but you know what IT WILL ALL BE WORTH IT IN THE END.

Thanks so much for your time Dumi – keep soaring!


Follow us on Instagram and Facebook!

Social Coding for Girls

Social Coding for Girls

Social Entrepreneur, Thembiso Magajana, shares her heartwarming journey of how “Social Coding for Girls” project started.

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-13 at 3.43.10 PM

My journey to becoming a Social Entrepreneur is not a very profound one. There are no heartfelt antidotes of how from a young age I knew I wanted to save the world or be a champion of the community. In fact, I grew up pretty self-absorbed, only concerned about my little bubble.

That was until my aunt had a baby and I soon became cousins with the most extraordinary little girl you have ever seen. Although technically my cousin, I referred to her as my niece because she was 16 years younger than me and I was fiercely overprotected over her. Anything she wanted, I got for her. And as fate would have it, When she turned six years old, what she wanted, was to become a computer engineer.

Now wait, let’s go back a few paces.

Firstly, I come from an accounting background. That’s about as far from Computer Engineering as Paris is from Timbuktu. And to be completely honest, the only thing I really knew about using computers was how to do an excel spreadsheet.

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-13 at 3.42.37 PM

Fast forward to the morning my “niece” turned six, and decided that she would be an engineer who would build the worlds next Facebook and her “aunt” who could barely tell the difference between the on and off button on a computer, (although to be fair, the same button works for both functions) would be her teacher.

So that’s what I set out to do. I spent sleepless nights researching, reading “Computer programming for Dummies” and watching Youtube tutorials. Soon I was teaching her, what the internet was teaching me.

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-13 at 3.42.44 PM

One Saturday, She arrived at our lesson with 3 other young girls. And that’s how Social Coding was born. With 4 six years old’s and one laptop.

Presently, we’re an organization of 185 girls, all of whom are being taught digital entrepreneurship through computer programming by a teach of dedicated Social Coding Volunteers. We are so set on ensuring that EVERY GIRL in South Africa has the opportunity to be exposed to Coding, that we even developed a special curriculum, where the girls are taught input and output programming using a blackboard, for workshops run in rural areas where girls may have never even seen or touched a Computer because it’s important for us to introduce technology to at a level that every girl can understand. Our Workshops not only teach young girls from as young as six how to be innovative creators, but how they can be leaders..conceptualists of community solutions because our mandate is “The sustainability of the creator and her community”. This organization is my life because I have seen it GIVE LIFE to others.

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-13 at 3.43.06 PM

So perhaps I didn’t set out to change the world.

But the World certainly changed me.

The Xhosa Sci-Fi book everyone’s asking about!

The Xhosa Sci-Fi book everyone’s asking about!

black kid

By Sihle Isipho Nontshokweni

Leading up to the last post, many of our followers on social media have been asking about the book.  “George’s Secret Key to the Universe” titled Iqhosha eliyimfihlelo kaGeorge kuzungezo lweNdalo, in isiXhosa, is a delightful science fiction book for young readers.

The book carries a scientific message for children, exposing them to a world of science, astronomy, and physics. This read strikes a balance between adventure and science. In several segments of the book, the adventure is suspended and Lucy and Steven Hawking’s expound further on the science, detailing themes such as exoplanets, the origin of life, and of course the black hole. Amid an adventure filled story, a great deal of learning occurs, which means that the usefulness of the book continues after the reader has put the book down.

Xolisa was inspired to translate this book after seeing how captured her then nine year-old son was by the content in the book. She continues to say “I thought if my son can learn and love science through fiction at the tender age of 9, what of other 9-year-olds in the country?” The experience of translating George’s Secret Key to the Universe affirmed Xolisa’s belief that stories can be used as a stimulus, an appetite wetter to invoke enthusiasm for physics amongst young readers. To conclude she says for too long Africans believed that there is no language in science and mathematics, yet there is.

Xolisa’s work is a massive gain for all who are invested in rebuilding quality education in South Africa. To begin, Xolisa is taking content that is commonly consumed by those who can fluently read English and is exposing the material to Xhosa readers. Secondly, she is matching languages with stories, because without language a child can never access the knowledge or the story. Given the two-tier education system in South Africa, Xolisa understands the challenges of expecting children to learn through a language they do not speak, a language that is not spoken by their parents and a language they do not think in.

This problem is worse in poorer schools where children experience at best three years of mother tongue, then changing to English medium schools after a year of English introduction. This is the tale of two cities where children in predominantly township schools (commonly with a poor command of the English language) are likely to be disadvantaged both through language and pedagogy. Thirdly, Xolisa is boldly building up a glossary of African terms, so that scientific words are not confined to the English language, but are rather explored in African language. This is a major step towards the intellectualization of African languages in the South African context and beyond.

Clearly, Xolisa Guzula’s work puts children at the center. Xolisa challenges black families especially where parents work eight or more hour days, with weekends tied to community commitments, to ponder the question: “Where do we put our children on our list of priorities?”

George’s Secret Key to the Universe will be published by Jacana Media. The Zulu manuscript is soon to be finalised before the books go to printing. Jacana Media usually place their books at Exclusive Books stores and at The Book Lounge.


Sibongile Zungu launches the preferred South African Travel Company

Sibongile Zungu launches the preferred South African Travel Company

This past week I spoke to Sibongile Zungu, a qualified registered Chartered Accountant, who just launched her Travel Company called Preferential Travel.  She astutely describes herself as ambitious, witty, spiritual and romantic and spares a moment to share her past and prospects with us!

1. Tell us about your business and background.

SZ: I come from a family of entrepreneurs, yet I never believed in entrepreneurship. I felt it was unnecessarily risky, when I could easily live a very comfortable life with a 9-5 day job, ever-so-often waking up and wondering how much sick leave I still have available.
Preferential Travel is quite simply a travel company that arranges affordable travel experiences (mainly road trips) within South Africa for individuals, couples, and groups of up to 20. We have accommodation partners in most tourist attraction destinations in South Africa, and have an option on our website for clients to obtain quotes for destinations we don’t currently have listed.
Every single listed property on Preferential Travel’s site, is a place I would personally visit and can personally vouch for. I love adventure and natural surroundings, and all the properties offer that – not to mention they’re all very reasonably priced.
To the best of my knowledge, we are one of very few travel companies that also have CSI initiatives. Shammah Safe House is an amazing children’s home and we are proud to have partnered with them.

2. What are the challenges you face as a young, female entrepreneur?

1. Adequate emotional support.
2. Finding a quality mentor that is willing to actually invest time in you.
3. Finances
4. Time management – particularly if you have an 8 hour full-time job.

For my industry, specifically, I noticed very quickly that it’s a very tough industry to break into, and accommodation owners are not very open to helping start-ups. I had a good number of phone calls dropped in my ear and emails not returned whilst I was gathering my initial client base. I remember the first rejection email, of many, I received several weeks ago – “Sorry. The owners are not interested. Regards”. Such things fuelled me, and still fuel me, to push even harder.

3. What do you hope to achieve in your business?

SZ: Preferential means “superior”, “favoured”, “better” – I want the meaning of the name to manifest itself. So naturally, I envision Preferential Travel to be a leading travel company in South Africa, and I am branding it as such. I’m very fortunate to have travelled South Africa rather thoroughly, consequently I’m passionate about promoting local travel. I think our country is gorgeous!

I’m taking it step-by-step, and I truly value the partners that have decided to take this leap of faith with me. My main focus at the moment is on marketing. People need to know that Preferential Travel exists. I have the likes of Safarinow, RoomsforAfrica etc. as ultimate competition and I fully acknowledge that I won’t get to their level overnight. But I will get there. And do far “better”.

4. What keeps you going when the going gets tough?

SZ: Two things – God and my passion for travel. Just like my life, this entire venture is founded on Psalm 23:6.

5. Any words of encouragement to our network of ladies?

SZ: Hold the vision. Trust the process. Pray.

Bio: Sibongile grew up in Pietermaritzburg, Kwa Zulu Natal, with her parents and older brother then left for Pretoria in 2010 to study Accounting Sciences. She is currently working as an assistant manager in one of Africa’s leading professional services firms and is also studying towards a Masters in Taxation.


uBabes we Media does it again!

uBabes we Media does it again!

khanyi 2

Khanyi Dhlomo and the Ndalo Media team took to social media yesterday to announce their newest acquisition of the local Elle and Elle Deco licences.

This woman is no doubt a force to be reckoned with. She quietly works and lets her success make all the noise. This was something she alluded to at the talk I went to last year.

What does this takeover mean?

For the first time in its 21-year history in SA, the 71-year-old Elle media brand will be published by a 100% black-owned media company.

This means that our own people and media will have a stronger voice of communicating and projecting what is uniquely African and at an international standard.

This means black girls can dream far beyond their borders and colour outside of the lines, dominate and own things. This win is for all of us.

We eagerly await  the power and influence this takeover will have over the next generation. We celebrate with you!



Congrats Terry Pheto!

Congrats Terry Pheto!

Photo Credit: @TerryPheto


Congratulations to Moitheri “Terry” Pheto for winning an award, at The National Film Awards UK, for the best supporting actress category.  The acclaimed award was for her role as Naledi Khama in the film, A United Kingdom. 

The British romantic drama film explores the interracial marriage between the president, First Lady of Botswana and the challenges they faced.

Pheto keeps on slaying and putting South African women and artists on the map; a world class citizen and absolute gem!


Know your Worth with Judge Nolwazi Boqwana

Know your Worth with Judge Nolwazi Boqwana

If there is anyone who gives meaning to the context of dynamite coming in small packages it is Judge of the Western Cape High Court -Nolwazi Boqwana.


A group of ladies in high heels, colourful dresses and matching fascinators came together at a bespoke guest house to hear the wise words of Her Honour.

At first glance, one might think of her as dainty and soft, but wait until she stands on a pulpit.

The title of her message was “Know Your Worth”. A powerful delivery of how we can be sure of our identity if we learn what it means to be created in the image of God. This suggestion immediately established a sense of worth in the crowd.

“When you know, who are and who you are not, it informs your decision-making process,” she iterated. A dawning and defining moment for many of us.

The Lion King was her frame of reference. Remember the animated adventures of the young lion Simba, the heir of his father, Mufasa? The story is about Simba’s wicked uncle (the enemy), Scar, who plots to usurp Mufasa’s throne by luring father and son into a stampede of wildebeests. But Simba escapes, and only Mufasa is killed.

While the uncle rules with an iron paw, the prince grows up beyond the Savannah with his friends Timon and Pumbaa, aimlessly living by a philosophy: No worries for the rest of your days.

The plot twist occurs when his long last friend, Nala, comes to visit him to inform him of the squander of his kingdom. The young Prince must decide his fate: will he remain an outcast, or face his demons (Scar)  and become the King he was called to be?

Based on this example, Judge Boqwana encouraged the crowd to dust off old dreams and ideas that they may have long forgotten. She encouraged us to stand firm for what is right, as this commands respect. She told us to dominate and tread fearlessly in every area of our lives.

Our callings are not linked to our success and promotion only; many people are reliant on them and will be impacted by them only if we to respond to the call.

The one quote of hers that I took away and have being pondering on is: “Consciousness informs behaviour.”

Everything you do, every decision you take and treatment you accept is  based on how you view yourself. The power of carrying this out comes from knowing your worth.