She Don’t Stop : Music Review

The song, “She”, is about the undeniable strength of a woman. Depending on where you are spiritually or mentally, this song will either make you weep before it strengthens you or it will push you to continue.

Taken from her first album, Sing to the Moon, “She” was shot in South Africa and melodically picturises the perseverance and persistence of our women.

The line “She’s tired – but she don’t stop” encourages me every time to continue to press towards the goal. It gives one hope that you can indeed move mountains and do your heart’s work.

Laura Mvula is a London based soulful vocalist known for her inventive, atmospheric mix of R&B, jazz, classical, and pop. She’ll be back in the country this December for the first Afropunk in South Africa.

She don’t stop.

#Womandla

The night I “met” Laura Mvula

This past weekend was the 18th installment of Africa’s greatest music gathering!  I had the privilege of attending my very first Cape Town International Jazz Festival with my friends – an experience I will never forget or miss again.

The melanin magic and main reason I attended, Laura Mvula, appeared on the stage, showing off her strong gams and bedazzled hands. She opened the show by saying: “Hello Cape Town, I’m home!” – automatically enthusing the crowd.

I was wondering how she’d bring across her cosmic sound and orchestral reverb to a live audience but being the professional, prepared, international act that she is – I quickly forgot those thoughts!

She was all kinds of amazing. She sang ALL of my favourite tunes and introduced me to a lot more. I was so moved. I lost my voice and all kinds of composure whilst singing along!

I love how one of her followers on Instagram says: “You didn’t close the show – you shut it down!” And that she did with her powerful anthem inspired by Maya Angelou’s poem “Phenomenal Woman.”

Thank you Laura for coming to South Africa, next time we will be coming to you!

#Womandla

Junie- A song about Black Appropriation

I haven’t covered music in a while! What better way to revisit this interest than with Solange’s new album A Seat at the Table?

I have been an avid fan of Solange’s work (and sartorial elegance), since the days of Sandcastle Disco, T.O.N.Y and I Decided. She knows this. I have felt her emotions, held her hand through Lover’s in the Parking Lot and her vulnerable Black Cab Sessions.

This new chart topping album has exhibited the singers beautifully pared layers of black identity, all the while giving respect to legendary musicians.

Solange’s song “Junie,” a groovy jam that confronts the appropriation of black culture was named after music legend Junie Morrison.

She skilfully tackles the issue of black appropriation in her lyrics: You want to be the teacher/ Don’t want to go to school/ Don’t want to do the dishes/ Just want to eat the food.

(Get it? Read it again)

Music social activism is no new concept. Hip Hop and RAP stem and exist through it. Motown, Blues and Jazz all have undertones and royal levels of depth about topical and sociopolitical struggles. Soul music has also been an honest reflection of feelings and moods.

Solange has put together a masterpiece, skilfully assembling all these attributes and travelling through history and time to deliver this piece of art.

Do yourself a favour and Jump on it! 

The Chokin Kind (of love)-Joss Stone

I was recently described as anti-relationships. I’m not offended at all. I am anti premature anything really. I went on a Twitter rampage supporting my psychological reasons of why I believe as young women we should be alone in our 20s. My main reason being that most guys around the same age group are not ready for commitment and that you will hate the beauty that is love because of a transitory “desire” therefore misconception.
Shortly after I listened to this hidden gem of Joss Stone, I knew I was on the right lane. It was also after a string of tweets of heartbreak on my timeline that I suppose, supported my sweeping statements.
Age and experience are not only viable for job vacancies ladies but are criteria we should consider before we stir up love too.
Some advice for maturity, first decide who you want to be before wanting to belong to someone else. I’d hate for you to find out later that your purpose was not realized because you felt too alone at a juvenile stage of your life.
Leverage your youthful years. You will have many years later to share with somebody else. Make friends. At least have some hope.